Body language and gestures

For example, when one person hugs another, most observers silently assume that the back patting that occurs towards the end of the hug is a gesture of affection and that the air kisses made - the sound made on the side of someone's cheek - is also affection. The reality is that the pat is used in the same way professional wrestlers use it - to tell the other person to end the hug and break the clinch. If you are really not too keen about hugging someone but are forced into it because the people ahead of you did it, you're likely to begin the back patting in the air even before the hug begins. The air kiss - with its accompanying sound - is given as a displacement of a real kiss that we don't want to give either.

Body language and gestures

Ten; I surrender Greece: Up Yours -- twice! You are a well-travelled, well-rounded, broad-thinking person who gets on well with everyone regardless of where they are from. You have a basic awareness that others behave differently to you and, with dedicated practice, you can improve the understanding you currently have.

You think everyone thinks like you do. You should never be issued a passport or even be allowed out of the house.

Hey there! Lots of writers liked my list of facial expressions, so I thought I would do a companion post about gestures and body language. Describing these can help readers visualize a scene and get a feel for the characters, and again, they can set up lines of dialogue so you don’t have a string. Chapter 15 AFFAIRS OF THE HEART: SIGNALS OF ATTRACTION AND FLIRTATION. Try flirting without using body language. Go on, give it a go. Surprise! It can't be done. Body language is our most powerful and natural way to interact with others. Learn how YOU can use nonverbal communication to your advantage!

You are probably an American. For example, Australians in their sixties will identify the British Two-Fingers-Up gesture as an insult whereas an Australian teenager is more likely to read it as the number two and will recognize the American Middle-Finger-Raised as a main form of insult.

Study Body Language

American television is the prime reason cultural body language differences are disappearing. Cultural Basics are the Same Almost Everywhere As discussed earlier, facial expressions and smiles register the same meanings to people almost everywhere.

Paul Ekman of the University of California, San Francisco, showed photographs of the emotions of happiness, anger, fear, Body language and gestures, disgust and surprise to people in 21 different cultures and found that in every case, the majority in each country agreed about the pictures that showed happiness, sadness and disgust.

There was agreement by the majority in 20 out of the 21 countries for the surprise expressions, for fear on 19 out of 21 agreed and for anger, 18 out of 21 agreed. The only significant cultural difference was with the Japanese who described the fear photograph as surprise.

Adolf Hitler Practised His Body Language – Assessing Hitler’s Bizarre Gestures and Postures

Ekman also went to New Guinea to study the South Fore culture and the Dani people of West Irian who had been isolated from the rest of the world. He recorded the same results, the exception being that, like the Japanese, these cultures could not distinguish fear from surprise.

He filmed these stone-age people enacting these same expressions and then showed them to Americans who correctly identified them all, proving that the meanings of smiling and facial expressions are universal.

This system allowed researchers to record, separate and catalogue infant facial expressions and they found that both Japanese and American infants displayed exactly the same emotional expressions. So far in this resource the focus has been on body language that is generally common to most parts of the world.

The biggest cultural differences exist mainly in relation to territorial space, eye contact, touch frequency and insult gestures. The regions that have the greatest number of different local signals are Arab countries, parts of Asia and Japan.

Understanding cultural differences is too big a subject to be covered in a short space, consequently the emphasis here is on the basic things that you are likely to see abroad. British, Australian, New Zealander, German and American colleagues will usually shake hands on meeting, and again on departure.

Most European cultures will shake hands with each other several times a day, and some French have been noted to shake hands for up to 30 minutes a day. Indian, Asian and Arabic cultures may continue to hold your hand when the handshake has ended.

This is hilarious to observe at international conferences where a range of different handshake pumping takes place between surprised delegates. To the Americans, the Germans, with their single pump, seem distant. To the Germans however, the Americans pump hands as if they are blowing up an airbed.

When it comes to greeting with a cheek kiss, the Scandinavians are happy with a single kiss, the French mostly prefer a double, while the Dutch, Belgians and Arabs go for a triple kiss.

The Australians, New Zealanders and Americans are continually confused about greeting kisses and bump noses as they fumble their way through a single peck.

Body language and gestures

The British either avoid kissing by standing back or will surprise you with a European double kiss.Hey there! Lots of writers liked my list of facial expressions, so I thought I would do a companion post about gestures and body language.

Describing these can help readers visualize a scene and get a feel for the characters, and again, they can set up lines of dialogue so you don’t have a string.

Body language How to read body language signs and gestures - non-verbal communications - male and female, for work, social, dating, and mating relationships. Adolf Hitler Practised His Body Language – Assessing Hitler’s Bizarre Gestures and Postures Christopher Philip.

Hi there and welcome. In this section you can find all than you need to know about body language signs and their meanings. To be more specific, this section of the site is about a more "permanent" and static signals in the behavior of men. It's about stances, positions and attitudes rather than one time gestures or quick face expressions..

In contrast - in the gestures section you will find. Body language is an unconscious outward reflection of inner feelings so, if you feel positive or affirmative, your head will begin to nod as you speak. Conversely, if you simply start nodding your head intentionally, you will begin to experience positive feelings.

GESTURES: YOUR BODY SPEAKS. 3. M. ore than half of all human communication takes place nonverbally.

Body language and gestures

You are. constantly sending nonverbal messages – even as you read these words.

5 Ways to Read Body Language - wikiHow